Adventures in Parenting: TMI & Social Media

Wow, it’s been a while since the last Adventures in Parenting post!  Today’s is an important one: parenting & social media.

Last week, there was an incident involving my six-year-old son & a disciplinary action taken by the school. I posted it on Facebook & Twitter. That evening, my husband & I got into a discussion about how I shouldn’t have posted that information on those social media sites. Despite the fact that said son is only six year’s old, my husband felt it was “forever” and could have an impact on my son. My retort: he’s six. If the incident involved my twelve-year-old son, who has friends on social media, I definitely wouldn’t post it.

So, the question I pose to you: do we share too much on social media?  I’m not talking about posting pictures from the actual labor & delivery room or pictures of your son’s first successful trip to the potty.  Those are definitely over the top. But information wise: do we share to much? Will it impact our children? Just what is TMI on social media?

13 thoughts on “Adventures in Parenting: TMI & Social Media

  1. That’s a tough one. Social media wasn’t around when Vance was that age, so I didn’t have to worry about it. I think you and your husband need to figure out what works for you.


  2. I post very limited things on FB about myself and my family. I took that stance from the beginning. Why – I have a very large family and I guess I’d rather not have them sticking their nose in my world.

    So… I post vague things like, “Poor kiddo has a bad cold.” or “Some elementary school employees would be better suited as debt collectors.”

    :-)

    I don’t think I’ve even told my online FB friends my son’s real name. I’m that private. Or at least try to be.

    ~ Jenna
    The Book Snoop


  3. I would share very few intimate family details.I think children no matter how young are sensitive,you never know whose parents read the blog &somehow it gets back to the child.


  4. My husband and I had this debate when I posted a questions looking for information on something for our son. He said that it’s a private family matter, I said twitter is a great source for information and that’s what I was using it for. He had such an issue with it that I deleted the tweets about it. Now, I’m just a little more careful about what I put because he’s so sensitive.

    I wouldn’t have posted it on FB because the people on FB would have had the information I was looking for. :)


  5. I share more on Facebook than I do on Twitter, because my FB account is locked down tight and I have everyone in groups so I can post those potty pictures to just my family. I have to disagree about the labor and delivery room photos, that’s a beautiful moment and there is nothing wrong with sharing it. I saw a family live tweet the whole experience and it was lovely. Its all a matter of opinion and besides so major faux paus (a pic of the baby coming out vs a pic of the baby that came out and is being held by the doctor) social media is meant to be used in a social way of your choosing. Adisyn is eight now and is very selective about what she allows me to share. Elijah is a baby so I share what I want.


  6. I think of all the scary things out there and you never know how things will get used. But I did l appreciate what you wrote because of my friends with kids and their stories.


  7. I think everyone has their own levels. My daughter’s 11, but I would never post anything that I think would embarrass her or upset her teachers or friends.


  8. My fb is full of friends and family, near and far. Twitter is mostly for my blogging, reading, etc. Yes I know a few writters and bloggers IRL so to speak, but I’m free-er to vent on twitter if I need. My kids are also teens.
    Oh I also do blog about more sensitive issues with the kids, but not every single detail, there have been big ups and downs with teens. My blog is a place for me, it’s books, and a personal journal to vent and express. I know it’s “out there” but I guess in 20 years no one will care.
    You will find the right balance…it’s all good.


  9. Definitely an interesting question. There’s probably about as many pros as cons. I guess the rule of thumb I’d use is if the info being posted online is something I wouldn’t mind being posted about myself.

    Smiles!
    Lori


  10. Great question and it was great to hear the range of thoughts. I like Lori’s suggestion – always a good way to gauge a comment. I tend to be pretty open on FB and Twitter, but as my girls grow into teens and have their own social media lives, they may disagree and we’ll see what happens. I do tend to be careful not to say mean things about my husband, especially when it might be misinterpreted.


  11. I think it depends on the situation. When my five year old son got into a bit of trouble at school, I didn’t post anything about it. He was really sorry and embarrassed about the whole thing and I didn’t want one of my friends or acquaintances mentioning it or trying to joke about it with him.


  12. Oh man, this is such a tough question because it’s so subjective. I’m careful not to post pictures or use my neice’s name as I tend to be a big scaredy cat. Also, I wouldn’t want one of her friends to google her name and then find something I said. At almost 16 years old now pretty much everything mortifies her. LOL I also never post pictures though I don’t think that’s a big deal at this point mainly becuase she’s got crap all over Facebook. I think I tend to be more stringent than I need to be.

    I think that if you nickname the kids so that future searches won’t actually find your posts you might find a happy medium.


  13. An interesting question, since we talk about our kids on the Tidy Books blog with regards to reading. I’ve always been careful not to use real names, and to talk about reading only, and not about what they have done.


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