Review: The Reckoning by Alma Katsu

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Gallery Books (June 19, 2012)
  • ISBN-10: 1451651805
  • Source: Author

It’s been two hundred years since Lanore entombed the horribly wicked Adair behind a wall of stone and brick. She now lives in London with her new lover, Luke Findlay. In an attempt to atone for her past sins she is giving away the treasures she has accumulated over the years. Despite the horrible brutality Adair used to show his love for Lanore, she still feels guilty for entombing him. Additionally, just months before she was forced…urged by Jonathan, a man who she had loved with all her heart, to end his suffering.

Meanwhile, the massive home in which she and Adair resided, the place in which he gave her eternal life, is being demolished. This destruction frees Adair from his tomb and he has only one thing on his mind: find Lanore.

Lanore notices instantly that Adair is free; she senses a tingling in her body she cannot explain. Despite being an ocean away, she instantly feels fear for what Adair may do to her when he does find her. Unwilling to allow Luke to risk his life and the lives of his daughter, she flees. She locates friends from her past, other immortals, to assist her. Fans of The Taker will recognize many of these characters. Knowing that Adair has just as many individuals willing to assist him, yet not realizing that those she chooses to trust are working for the very man from which she runs. Understanding there is no point of attempting to evade Adair she instead decides to build up the strength, both mentally and physically, to confront him.

Meanwhile, Adair is forced to adjust to the changes in technology (and attire) that have transpired over the past two centuries. He uses this technology to track down his spell books, willing to do whatever it takes to get Lanore back. He performs a spell that brings back from the dead someone so near and dear to Lanore’s heart that she cannot resist the temptation to find him.

In The Taker, we learn of the sick and sadistic relationship Adair has with Lanore. At first, she was drawn to his power but soon learned of his plans to switch souls with Jonathan. It was then that Lanore decided to end Adair’s reign. In The Reckoning, Katsu very eloquently reveals a great deal of Adair’s past, how he became immortal, how he achieved his level of power.  Never a fan of Adair myself, I still found it quite interesting to learn about his history and how he became the horribly vile creature he is now. Additionally, we see a lighter, kinder (though not by much) side of Adair. Despite this, I still hold a great deal of hatred for his character, though this new information lessens my feelings of hate a bit.

Bottom line, The Reckoning is a tremendous follow up to The Taker and serves the role a second book in a trilogy should: fill the reader in with more information on the history of the characters. Additionally, the ending paves a clear path to the third book in this trilogy, and a hopeful ending at that! My favorite part of this trilogy, what I think is the biggest selling point,  is the skillful way the author portrays the concept of immortality metaphysically, magically, without the need for supernatural characters.

Ultimately, The Reckoning is a novel about redemption, betrayal and, for you romantics out there the power of love. This is a trilogy you cannot afford to miss out on! Highly, highly recommended.

Note: I do feel it is important to be transparent about my relationship with Alma. I do consider her a dear friend; we’ve shared meals together and I have very willingly provided advice and pointers to her along the way. I was beyond ecstatic to find myself mentioned in the acknowledgements. All this said, my friendship with Alma in no way influenced this review or my feelings about this book.

4 thoughts on “Review: The Reckoning by Alma Katsu

  1. No I love Alma too, with all my heart. She is genuine and real. BUT this book is kicking my butt in the best way! OMG. So friend or not, I have no choice but to fall under this book’s spell. I am about halfway through and am about to rip my hair out because all I want to do is just sit and read it, but my kids are keeping me busy all day. Many times the middle book is a means to and end, but not this one.

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