Review: Thirteen Hallows by Michael Scott & Colette Freedman

  • Hardcover:352 pages
  • Publisher:Tor Books; First Edition edition (December 6, 2011)
  • ISBN-10: 0765328526
  • Source: Publisher

The thirteen hallows are ancient artifacts embedded with deadly powers.  They were divided among thirteen Keepers, assigned to keep them hidden and, more importantly, apart from one another. Unfortunately now the keepers are being brutally murdered, their blood awakening the power in the hallows they protected for decades.  Only a few remain, one of the last passing on her hallow to a young, unwitting Sarah Miller, a stranger she met on the street.  Prior to her death, she asks Sarah to take the hallow to her American nephew, Owen.

Along the way, many others are killed, including those near and dear to Sarah.  She becomes the prime suspect, the local law enforcement certain she’s lost her mind, killing without abandon. They believe Owen will be her next victim, his disappearance is really an abduction by her hands. The police aren’t the only ones hunting down Sarah and Owen; the Dark Man and his seductress mistress are on their trail as well.

As Sarah continue on their trek throughout England and Wales, they begin to uncover the secrets behind the hallows that the keepers worked hard to protect. Ultimately, the relic they hold, a sword that, upon first glance, looks broken & rusted, is the one thing that separates our world with unimaginable horrors.

The Thirteen Hallows is the first book in a saga revolving around the myth of the thirteen hallows of Britain. As the first novel in a series, it is full of rich detail and characters.  The number of characters, their involvement and importance varying, can seem overwhelming. I found that it helped to keep a list of the characters and their relationship to the hallows themselves.

I’ve seen this book recommended in a few locations to those readers who are fans of the Harry Potter series. I believe it is imperative to mention that these should be adult readers, for The Thirteen Hallows is definitely not a book I would recommend to a middle grader or young teen. There is a great deal of violence, specifically as related to the killing of the keepers. The killings aren’t quick and easy, but torturous and full of almost devastating violence.  That said, The Thirteen Hallows is a book that I would recommend to adult readers, especially those interested in fantasy, myth, etc. I’m interested to see where the writers will take this series!

For those of you unfamiliar with the authors, they have quite the impressive resume.  Michael Scott is an authority on mythology and folklore. A master of fantasy, science fiction and horror, this New York Times best-selling author of Delacorte’s young adult series, The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel (which includes The Alchemist, The Magician, and The Sorceress) has his novels sold in over 37 countries.  Internationally produced playwright and screenwriter Colette Freedman has won over sixty awards for her commercial writing and directing, and was recently named one of the Dramatist Guild’s “50 to Watch.”

Obviously, Scott & Freedman know what they are talking about and can be considered experts on mythology & folklore. Their expertise really comes into play in The Thirteen Hallows, the history & folklore they discuss weren’t things they pulled out of their hats but are instead things that have popped up in myths for centuries.

Bottom line: looking for a new series, guaranteed to grab your attention and take you on a roller coaster ride of intense excitement? This is the book for you. Recommended.

Check back later today as I have an extra copy of this book available for giveaway!

6 thoughts on “Review: Thirteen Hallows by Michael Scott & Colette Freedman

  1. I’m currently about a third of the way through this and I’m enjoying it a lot. I can’t wait to finish it although I’m sure I’ll just want more!



  2. Pingback: Giveaway: The Thirteen Hallows by Michael Scott & Colette Freedman | Jenn's Bookshelves


  3. I’m so glad to hear that this one is good! I just finished reading The Alchemyst, and I enjoyed it, but for whatever reason, I was nervous about how this would be. I’ll have to go out and pick up a copy!


  4. I am about 75% through the first book – I love it. As a fan of quality mythic fiction – (Judith Tarr and Morgan Llewelyn come to mind), I am very well pleased.


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